Empowerment and Training

Training Trainers

Date: Thursday February 5, 2015 / Author of post:

ASKING AND ANSWERING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

  • CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT IN THE CARIBBEAN

What should we be doing? What do we have to do it? What are we missing? How will we get it?

Capacity development is a practice which is deemed important in the life of organisations especially those which take their purpose seriously.  The church is one such organisation and Council for World Mission (CWM) has chosen to help member churches achieve the purpose of developing missional congregations through Capacity Development.

CWM Caribbean is working with the Guyana Congregational Union and the United Church in Jamaica and the Cayman Islands to equip persons as trainers to help congregations to plan strategically and develop the skills and resources necessary to implement programmes and become a community which is responsive to the needs of people.

On November 6-8, 2014 in Runaway Bay, Jamaica, twenty six persons including 3 trainers spent three days learning and sharing ideas for Conducting Mission Audits, Developing a Strategic Plan, Conducting a Capacity Audit and Designing a Capacity Development Plan.  All of this was prefaced by sessions on Missional Congregations: Renewal and Transformation and Mission in the Context of Empire.

The material that was shared built on presentations at the Life Affirming Communities Workshop held in April 2013 in India planned by CWM’s Empowerment and Training Unit. The presentations in November were designed to deliver contextualised content for maximum application and relevance.  CWM Caribbean worked with the leadership of the member churches to determine the best way to cascade the training and it was decided that they would identify persons to work with the geographical groupings in which their unions were already divided.  Regional Deputy General Secretaries of UCJCI and the General Secretary of GCU participated in the design of the plan.  The content was then developed by both CWM Caribbean representatives to the workshop in India as well as Elaine Commissiong, Karen Francis and corporate trainer, Marlene Thomas.

CANACOM also shared in the experience as observers by sending three representatives from Trinidad, Dominican Republic and Grenada.

The energy and engagement during the workshop were of a high standard as these were observed by the Planning and Training team. Feedback from the participants indicated that it was very practical and detailed and that the resource material was comprehensive and useful.  It was noted that most of the regions had identified persons who already had some capacity in training and so ideas were shared between participants at table groups.  At the end of the workshop they were given opportunity to deliver an aspect of the training themselves.